Sushi Guide

sushi-guide This Sushi Guide is the official guide of the Utah Sushi Roll which lists all the sushi restaurants in Utah, gives them ratings and hopes to introduce you to just what makes their restaurant so special.

In most restaurants in Utah you’ll find four different types of Japanese food which rank from standard sushi rolls to sashimi.  Please note that not all sushi is RAW FISH.  I’ve shared a number of rolls with people who don’t like raw fish and they’ve loved it.  Sushi really is all about the mixture of rice, it has nothing to do with RAW FISH.  Having said that we also talk about and show pictures of some wonderful RAW FISH from nigiri to sashimi.

Think of sushi as a journey throughout life, first you learn to walk and then you learn to run.  You can start off with a number of simple dishes and work your way up.  There are so many amazing flavors and textures out there just waiting for you to experience, so dig in and enjoy!

Standard Rolls:  You can order most standard rolls from any sushi restaurant and know that you are getting the same thing at any location.

Specialty Rolls:  Most sushi restaurants will have a list of specialty rolls that are specific to that restaurant.

Nigiri: More adventurous sushi eaters might be interested in nigiri.  A simple description of nigiri would be: fish on rice.

Sashimi: Sashimi is the granddaddy of all sushi.  While nigiri has the ‘safety net’ of providing you with rice in addition to the fish, sashimi is just cut pieces of raw fish.

Where should you begin?  Here is a good guide based on your experience level:

 Types of Sushi Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Standard Roll California Roll
Tuna Roll
Spicy Tuna Roll Yellowtail
Specialty Roll Tempura / Crunch Roll
Idaho Maki Roll
Utah Roll
007 Roll Rainbow Roll
Nigiri  - Salmon Salmon Roe
Octopus
Sashimi  -  - Hamachi

Still need more help?  If so, check this out:

Beginners Guide:

Sushi is a Japanese food that is typically made of cooked rice mixed with other ingredients including raw fish and other seafood.  It is presented and prepared in many different ways, and can provide an adventurous eater with a new frontier of mealtime possibilities.  Sushi can be rolled, folded, bunched and even fried!  As a beginner sushi eater, it is important to know that not all sushi is raw and not all sushi even has fish in it!  Yes, you can love sushi even if you don’t like fish!  Here are a few guidelines to get you started:

Good beginner options:

Fried rolls: Fried rolls are a great way to start eating sushi.  The fried flavor is familiar and lets you taste fish without it being the dominant flavor.  Most sushi restaurants with clearly state which of their rolls are fried so after reviewing the ingredients, pick one that is quite plain, but fried for a good starter sushi roll.

California roll: this is a classic roll that has avocado and crab meat in it—that’s it!  It is wrapped in rice and seaweed (which isn’t as bad as it sounds) and is a great mild roll to start with.

Veggie roll: Most sushi restaurants will offer a veggie roll which will taste similar to a regular roll and help you get used to the rice and seaweed flavors that are found in most sushi rolls.

Rice paper substitution: most rolls are wrapped in seaweed.  This can often times be the most important ingredient in a good roll because good seaweed has a mild flavor but bad seaweed can be more powerfully flavored than the fish.  A good alternative for those who are worried about the seaweed would be to ask for rice paper instead.  It is flavorless and keeps your roll held together just as well and is available at most sushi restaurants.

Shrimp rolls: Many restaurants will offer a roll that is filled with fried shrimp.  Shrimp cannot be served raw, so these rolls provide you with a way to get some meat in your sushi without having to pick something raw.  This will give you an authentic sushi feel—if you like this, you might like something with fish in it!  Try tuna or salmon to start for a mild taste and soft texture.

Load up on soy sauce!:   Soy sauce is the ketchup of Japanese cuisine.  When sushi is served, it will almost always come with a little dish that is meant to hold your soy sauce.  If you like soy sauce, it is a great way to enhance the flavors of your sushi.  If you try a roll that isn’t your favorite, dipping it in soy sauce can help you still enjoy the roll.  For those who would like even more flavor, try adding a small dollop of wasabi (the green paste that comes with your sushi) to the soy sauce and mix it in well.  It will add a ‘kick’ of spicy heat to your sauce. Warning: Don’t eat the wasabi plain or in large quantities unless you want a spicy explosion in your mouth—it has a powerful spicy/hot flavor that is best diluted in soy sauce.

Other Sauces:  Not only do you have soy sauce to enhance the flavor of your rolls, but you can have spicy mayo and yum yum suace, Eel sauce which is very sweet, Siracha and hot sauces and fruit sauces like Mango and Pineapple.  The combinations really are endless.

Have you mastered these options?  If so, you have graduated from the ‘beginner sushi eater’ status and are now an ‘intermediate sushi buff’!  Congratulations!  Try a few classic rolls and begin moving into more raw fish!  You are on your way!

 

 

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